Category Archives: Bridging Neighbours

With spring comes thoughts of food (stories)

For the last 3 years or so, this time of year has conjured up promises of an abundance that many Vancouverites don’t often get to experience first-hand. Had I the proper skills, experience, and business savvy, I might consider myself an urban farmer; but lacking that connectedness to the act of growing food as a direct part of my livelihood, I can only claim to be an accidental gardener with a penchant for heirloom tomatoes.

As a gardener in this neighbourhood, I am not very unique. I am flanked by fig trees grown by elders of Italian origin and forests of gai lan manicured by a Chinese grandfather. I inherited a portion of my current gardening space from a Vietnamese family who took some of their celery root and spring onions with them, and the 20-year-old rhubarb that covers a good portion of one of my garden beds was generously donated by a Polish lady who lives several blocks away. It seems like your typical smorgasbord of gardeners and perhaps it is: in a very basic way, we are all contributing to our own food security (ie. by growing our own food).

But I’m often left wondering: what more can be done? It’s no doubt satisfying to take, from just outside my front door, the spoils of my collaborative effort with nature and certainly there are many organizations in Vancouver who believe strong food systems are an integral part of the city. The city’s Social Planning committee has been actively gathering feedback for the development of a citywide Food Strategy and increasingly, people are beginning to investigate and report on the lesser-known aspects of our regional food system. Rangi Changi Roots very much encourages everyone to get involved in these efforts. In the weeks to come, we’ll be sharing more opportunities that we feel will connect the threads of the ‘unheard’ stories around food in our city.

Vancouver-based LatinCouver Invites Students doing Sustainability Research with Links to Latin America

Students carrying out research on sustainability issues linked to Latin America have been invited to share their work at LatinCouver’s 3rd annual “Carnaval Del Sol”, a multicultural event celebrating more specifically, the Latin American community in Vancouver. Held on June 26th, 2011 on Granville St., in Downtown Vancouver, Carnaval features exciting performances by locally and nationally renowned Latin musical artists and folkloric dance troupes. This fun‐filled day includes salsa classes and street dancing. In Latin America soccer is an important activity that brings communities together.

LatinCouver will highlight the day by presenting a traditional street soccer tournament. Their Latin American plaza will include an open‐air food court that will offer authentic Latin American cuisine. Festival patrons will also enjoy the interactive cultural pavilion that includes a Latin American Art & Crafts Marketplace and children’s activities.

Students will be presenting their work in an area of the Festival that will be dedicated to issues of sustainability area. The students will share the space with Dr. David Suzuki, Vancouver’s Greenest City Team, and other organizations involved in sustainability locally, and in Latin America.

This is an opportunity for students to present their work to the general public in a creative and engaging way, helping us bridge the gap between the academic community  and the general public.

There will be prizes for all participants and the public will be able to vote for the most interesting work.

Latincouver expects to receive over 15,000 attendees to Carnaval del Sol.

The event takes place on June 26, 2011 on Granville Street between Smithe and West Pender (the street will be closed to traffic).

Please contact Oliver Lane for more information at oliver@oliverlane.info or by phone 778-232-8482.

Registration deadline is June 10, 2011.
LatinCouver is a non-profit organization connecting you with the Latin-American community in the Vancouver metropolitan area (www.latincouver.ca).

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List of Attendees at Rangi’s June 22nd Event

You asked us who attended our last public event, “Storytelling at the Intersection of Culture and Climate”

NAME                                                        ORGANIZATION

  1. Ashley Arden ……………………………..David Suzuki Foundation
  2. Antonio Arreaga ………………………..Honorary Consulate General, Costa Rica
  3. Maria Athie-Martine …………………UBC
  4. Tracy Bains ………………………………..UBC
  5. Rosie Barnwell
  6. Saul Brown ………………………………..Saul Good Gift Co.
  7. Ian Bruce………………………………….. David Suzuki Foundation
  8. Paula Cole ……………………………….. Vcommunity.tv
  9. Pablo Corry …………………………….. Lord Byng Secondary student
  10. Andrea Curtis ………………………….
  11. Tria Donaldson …………………….Canadian Youth Climate Coaltion
  12. Ping Fong ……………………………….   vcommunity.tv
  13. Stephen Goobie ………………………. Bodwell High School
  14. James Griffiths …………………………Sea Breeze Power Corp.
  15. Lana Gunnlaugson …………………. David Suzuki Foundation
  16. Erika Harrison …………………………Erika Harrison Consulting
  17. Michelle Hoar …………………………..The Tyee
  18. Fen Hsiao ………………………………….The Tyee
  19. Kyle Hyndman………………………….McCrae & Assoc.
  20. Winnie Hwo ……………………………..Freelance journalist
  21. Roxanne Joyce …………………………BC Health Coalition
  22. Emily Jubenvill ………………………..Edible Garden Project
  23. Azmina Kassam ……………………….Ilaaj
  24. Annalea Kreb …………………………..The Change
  25. Cherrie Lam …………………………….High school student
  26. Joseph Lin ……………………………….Green Club
  27. Nazanin M ………………………………..UBC
  28. Mauree Matsusaka ………………….Schema Magazine
  29. Andrea MacDonald …………………Dogwood Initiative
  30. Lindsay Marsh …………………………AMSSA
  31. Pia Massie ………………………………..media activist, environment’t
  32. Anil Mayar ……………………………….Phoenix Seven
  33. Tatyana Mayorova
  34. Neerav Mehta
  35. Lupita Michel …………………………..Latincouver
  36. Amanda Mitchell …………………….Design Ctr for Sustainability
  37. Ainaz Molaee …………………………..BC Sustainable Energy Association
  38. Paola Viviana Murillo……………..Latincouver, Latin Plaza
  39. Tamiko Ogura …………………………Vancouver School Board
  40. Monique Paemoller ………………..The David Suzuki Foundation
  41. Emily-Anne Paul ……………………. Toxic Free Canada
  42. Andrew Radzik ………………………..Western Wilderness Com
  43. Spencer Rasmussen ………………. goBEYOND
  44. Erika Rathje …………………………….David Suzuki Foundation
  45. Ulrike Rodrigues …………………….Sustainability Writer
  46. Linda Rubuliak ……………………….YMCA Connections
  47. Tanya Scaman …………………………Metro Vancouver
  48. Aarti Shah
  49. Christabel Shaler ……………………Early Risers/Vancouver Observer writer
  50. Olga Scherbina ……………………….Diversity Clues
  51. Shannon Smart ………………………The Tyee
  52. Shelby Tay ………………………………Transition US
  53. Eloginy Tharmendran ……………SafeTeen
  54. Megan Thom …………………………..Victoria Immigrant & Refugee Ctre Soc.
  55. Owen Thomas …………………………Self Design Learning Community
  56. Minna Van ………………………………The Network Hub
  57. Frédéric Van Caenege …………… Sustainable Community Devel’t, SFU
  58. Thi Vu ………………………………………Climate Justice
  59. Dilan Ying Wang …………………….Cinevolution Media Arts Society
  60. Winnie Hwo…………………………….BC Hydro
  61. Angela Willock ……………………….goBEYOND
  62. Cease Wyss ……………………………..Urban Native Youth
  63. Andy Yan …………………………………BTAworks
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MLA Mable Elmore tells RangiChangi Roots climate change is “central issue”

Straight.com

by Matthew Burrows

Mable Elmore, NDP MLA

Vancouver-Kensington NDP MLA Mable Elmore claims she and her staff “mobilized” her community to look at climate change in the wake of Typhoon Ondoy, which struck the Philippines last year.

“It was a broad call-out, but we made a specific initiative with the Filipino community,” Elmore told the small crowd at the June 22 RangiChangi Roots multicultural event at the Maple Grill on West Broadway. “So we invited all the community organizations. There are 150 in the Lower Mainland. There are a lot. It was a good first step in terms of participation, for the first time really raising these issues.”

RangiChangi is a group dedicated to breaking down barriers ethnic communities face educating themselves on climate change.

Elmore, who is part Filipina, told the Straight via cellphone that she mobilized the community to organize a forum on October 13, 2009, to which she invited No­nita Yap, a professor from the School of Environmental Design and Rural Development at the University of Guelph. The topic of discussion was how climate change will affect the Philippines.

At the RangiChangi event, Elmore said that, as part of the NDP and the Philippine community in general, climate change is an issue of major importance.

“It’s a central issue because we have a metabolic relationship with nature, with the environment,” Elmore said. “It’s part of us, we are part of nature. It’s something we have to consider in all our actions, also building a strong future economy in British Columbia.”

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